Distributed Ledgers: Shared control, not shared data

Distributed Ledgers: Shared control, not shared data

In the context of distributed ledgers, I have noticed that many commentators and consultants confuse shared control of data with the sharing of data itself. The difference is crucial, and this common simplification misses the most important aspect of distributed ledgers.

In this post I discuss three ideas:

  1. Sharing of data vs shared control of data
  2. Control of data by rules vs by power
  3. Enforcement of rules by participants

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A gentle introduction to The Hyperledger Project

A gentle introduction to The Hyperledger Project

I have noticed a great deal of confusion when people talk about “Hyperledger”.  I recently gave a talk about this at a meetup hosted in Paypal’s offices in Singapore.  This article summarises the talk.

Hyperledger is a project, not a technology, and you don’t build stuff on Hyperledger.

When people ask, “What is Hyperledger?”, the answer I give is usually “Do you mean the project called Hyperledger run by The Linux Foundation, or do you mean one of the ledger technologies incubated by that project which used to be confusingly called Hyperledger Fabric?”. The first is a group of people, the second other is a bunch of code.

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In a nutshell: Ian Grigg’s Ricardian contracts and digital assets prehistory

In a nutshell: Ian Grigg’s Ricardian contracts and digital assets prehistory

I enjoyed listening to Episode 151 of the podcast “Epicenter” (previously “Epicenter Bitcoin”) featuring Ian Grigg, inventor of Ricardian Contracts and blogger at Financial Cryptography. Here are my notes – part transcription, with some edits. This one is a goldmine and covers many topics: bonds, contracts, cash, Chaumian e-cash, DigiCash, financial cryptography, Ricardian contracts, digital signatures, smart contracts, dispute resolution, Ethereum, triple entry book-keeping, oh my!

Misunderstandings and paraphrasing errors are entirely mine.

This gets fairly technical; if this is hard to follow, it may be helpful to read my introduction to smart contracts first.  Hmm, if it’s still hard to follow, also read about blockchains and bitcoin and Ethereum, and digital tokens.

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A gentle introduction to Ethereum

A gentle introduction to Ethereum

Introduction

Ethereum builds on blockchain and cryptocurrency concepts, so if you are not familiar with these, it’s worth reading a gentle introduction to bitcoin and a gentle introduction to blockchain technology first. This article assumes the reader has a basic familiarity with how Bitcoin works.

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The emergence of blockchains as Activity Registers

This post tries to describe two very different uses for blockchain technology: Digital Token Ledgers that record ownership changes of digital tokens, and Activity Registers that record timestamped proofs of existence of data or agreements about data.  Bitcoin is used for both.

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So you want to use a blockchain for that?

There are good reasons and bad reasons to use blockchains. In conversations with people thinking about blockchain use cases, I have noticed common confusions and conflations arising from words initially used in a narrow context (usually to describe bitcoin’s blockchain) being understood more generically for blockchains. In this post I hope to untangle some of these common misconceptions.

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KPMG Report on Consensus: Interview with co-author George Samman

KPMG Report on Consensus: Interview with co-author George Samman

Q&A with George Samman, co-author of KPMG’s report: “Consensus: Immutable agreement for the Internet of value”

This interview is posted on both www.sammantics.com and www.bitsonblocks.net. Interviewer is Antony Lewis (AL) and interviewee is George Samman (GS).

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